July 21st 1951 – August 11th 2014
July 21st 1951 – August 11th 2014
“I used to think the worst thing in life was to end up all alone, it’s not. The worst thing in life is to end up with people that make you feel alone.”

Robin Williams was many things to many people, but he certainly was unique. Not many actors could bring the kind of comic genius that he brought to movies like Good Morning Vietnam, whilst at the same time retaining the ability to put in as serious a performance as he did in Good Will Hunting. Whilst at times his performances could be a little over sentimental, he was in the main, a superb actor with an ability to engage his audience from the kick off.

When tragedies affect the false world of Hollywood, the gushing praise that ensues can sometimes be far too syrupy, far too much and done in many cases for the wrong reasons. One gets the feeling that in this case, the plaudits and eulogies will be genuine and not contrived.

Williams was found dead aged 63 on August 11th in Marin County, California. The local sheriff immediately called it as suicide by asphyxiation. A terrible tragedy, to end such a giant of human spirit. He was a troubled soul though, and his quote above acts as a possible cruel clue to the reasons behind him taking his own life.

Few people watching Mrs. Doubtfire would believe that he had these dark moments. Such is the life of a troubled genius. I use the word carefully, but I feel that he genuinely was a genius. In Dead Poets Society, he really was my captain.

Sometimes on chat shows he was reluctant to share the stage with others, I remember one appearance with Billy Connelly where Billy was soldiering on, though looking a little miffed at Williams’ constant attempts to hog the limelight.

There is no mistaking the fact that Hollywood and the world of stand-up has lost a giant. He will be sadly missed, fortunately he leaves behind a legacy that will out live us all. But this is a sad, sad day for the world. Na-Nu Na-Nu.